The Kissinger transcripts

the top secret talks with Beijing and Moscow

Publisher: New Press, Publisher: Distributed by W.W. Norton in New York

Written in English
Cover of: The Kissinger transcripts |
Published: Pages: 515 Downloads: 932
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Places:

  • United States,
  • China,
  • Soviet Union,
  • Communist countries

Subjects:

  • Kissinger, Henry, 1923- -- Archives.,
  • National security -- United States -- History -- 20th century -- Sources.,
  • Cabinet officers -- United States -- Archives.,
  • United States -- Foreign relations -- 1969-1974 -- Sources.,
  • United States -- Foreign relations -- 1974-1977 -- Sources.,
  • China -- Foreign relations -- United States -- Sources.,
  • Soviet Union -- Foreign relations -- United States -- Sources.,
  • United States -- Foreign relations -- Communist countries -- Sources.,
  • Communist countries -- Foreign relations -- United States -- Sources.

Edition Notes

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Read excerpts from Nixon, Kissinger and Haldeman Memoirs. This Electronic Briefing Book features, for the first time published anywhere, the audio and transcripts of Nixon's first recorded conversations on J 14 and 15 after publication of the Pentagon Papers began. A History of the Pentagon Papers Case (Berkeley: University of. Late last year, Kissinger agreed to rele pages of notes and transcripts of phone calls made from to , when he was secretary of .   The archives contain transcripts from a tape recorder that turned in full view of the participants throughout Kissinger’s 28 visits to Damascus in and This book is .   “Dazzling and instructive [a] magisterial new book.” —Walter Isaacson, Time Henry Kissinger offers in World Order a deep meditation on the roots of international harmony and global disorder. Drawing on his experience as one of the foremost statesmen of the modern era—advising presidents, traveling the world, observing and shaping the central foreign policy /5(3).

Kissinger published lengthy telephone transcripts from this period in the book Crisis. On Octo under Nixon's direction, and against Kissinger's initial advice, [71] while Kissinger was on his way to Moscow to discuss conditions for a cease-fire, Nixon sent a message to Brezhnev giving Kissinger full negotiating : Kenneth Rush, Robert Ingersoll, . This book, the first full biography of Kissinger, explores the relationship between his complex personality - brilliant, conspiratorial, furtive, prone to power struggles, charming yet at times deceitful - and the foreign policy he pursued. memos of classified meetings, and transcripts of FBI wiretaps. The result is an intimate narrative 4/5(4). The Kissinger Transcripts, x. 6. This critical assessment of Kissinger's diplomatic style may be found in William Bundy, Tangled Web: The Making of Foreign Policy in the Nixon Administration (New York: Farrar, Straus, and Giroux, ). While Kissinger deserves credit for some of the foreign policy breakthroughs during the Nixon adminis. John Erlichman recorded his phone conversations, and every single conversation that Henry Kissinger had in his office was recorded, automatically, and overnight transcripts were made by a .

  In his book, On China, Kissinger describes the delicate diplomatic dance that ultimately took Nixon to the mainland in — the first public interaction between Chinese and U.S. leaders in. HENRY A. KISSINGER TELEPHONE CONVERSATION TRANSCRIPTS (TELCONS) SCOPE AND CONTENT NOTE The Kissinger telcons, released by the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) on , consist of approximat pages (10 cubic feet) of transcripts of Dr. Kissinger’s telephone conversations during his tenure as Assistant to. Diplomacy is a book written by former National Security Advisor and Secretary of State Henry is a sweep of the history of international relations and the art of diplomacy, largely concentrating on the 20th century and the Western ger, as a great believer in the realist school of international relations, focuses strongly upon the concepts of the balance Author: Henry Kissinger.   Now a conversation with Henry Kissinger about his new book. Titled "Crisis," it looks back at two major events when he was secretary of state: The Middle East war and the American.

The Kissinger transcripts Download PDF EPUB FB2

Although much of Burr's analysis leaves a lot to be desired, this book is a must have for a first hand look at Kissinger's diplomatic legacy. There is still much information that has not been declassified and therefore _The Kissinger Transcripts_ presents only a partial picture at best, but Burr's compilation is well worth the effort to see Kissinger's many different diplomatic faces /5(8).

The Kissinger Transcripts lets readers make up their own minds about the most controversial Secretary of State in modern U.S. history. The National Security Archive is a nonprofit research library of declassified U.S. Government Documents in Washington, D.C. This book is made up of a series of previously classified transcripts of Kissinger's negotiations with the Chinese and the Soviets.

I would say that is requires a lot of knowledge of the foreign policy under the Nixon and Ford administrations.4/5. Nevertheless, Lord's papers contain extremely significant material--the record of the Nixon-Mao meeting in February and transcripts of Kissinger's back-channel discussions with Chinese diplomats in Paris and New York--which greatly advance knowledge of Sino-American relations during the period.

Kissinger Transcripts and Related Material. The following documents are transcripts of several conversations that are either excerpted or discussed in The Kissinger Transcripts: The Top Secret Talks with Beijing and Moscow, A National Security Archive Document Reader, edited by William Burr (New York, The New Press, ).This group of documents is wide ranging in scope.

Kissinger on Kissinger is a series of faithfully transcribed interviews conducted by the elder statesman's longtime associate Winston Lord that captures Kissinger's thoughts on the specific challenges that he faced during his tenure as NSA, his general advice on leadership and international relations, and stunning portraits of the larger-than-life world leaders of the era.

S pages of the transcripts, covering Kissinger's tenure as Nixon's national-security adviser, from toand as Nixon's secretary of.

Although much of Burr's analysis leaves a lot to be desired, this book is a must have for a first hand look at Kissinger's diplomatic legacy. There is still much information that has not been declassified and therefore _The Kissinger Transcripts_ presents only a partial picture at best, but Burr's compilation is well worth the effort to see Kissinger's many different diplomatic faces /5.

Not a Kissinger transcript--the document was prepared by General Vernon Walters, the U.S. Army attaché in Paris--the document shows Nixon's assurance as a Cold War strategist and suggests that he had substantial capacity for setting the policy framework within which Kissinger had.

WASHINGTON, D.C., 10 January -- The National Security Archive at George Washington University today released its new book of previously top secret transcripts of Henry Kissinger's meetings with Chinese and Soviet leaders while he served as national security adviser and Secretary of State in the Nixon and Ford administrations, including the full transcript of the.

The Kissinger Transcripts opens with a lucid description of superpower relations in the early ’s. Even though the Cold War had begun to thaw, the. The Kissinger Telephone Conversation Transcripts Today the National Security Archive announces the publication of a comprehensively unique, thoroughly-indexed set of the telephone conversation (telcon) transcripts of Henry A.

Kissinger, one of the most famous and controversial U.S. diplomats of the second half of the 20th ting of 15, documents and. The Kissinger Transcripts The sheer volume of the Kissinger documentation qualifies for the Guinness Book — no top presidential adviser before or since has maintained such an extensive and.

[The Kissinger Transcripts] properly reclaims at least a portion of the record that should have long since become public property. New York Times Book Review The Kissinger Transcripts is among the most important Cold War records to emerge thus :   Archive Sues State Department Over Kissinger Telcons Transcripts Still Withheld, Eight Years after Appeal Threat of suit in led to recovery of Kissinger documents Digital National Security Archive has publis to date National Security Archive Electronic Briefing Book No.

Edited by William Burr. Posted March 4, The Kissinger telcons, released by the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) onconsist of transcripts of Dr.

Kissinger's telephone conversations during his tenure as Assistant to the President for National Security Affairs () and Secretary of State () during the administration of President Richard Nixon. But, this book is not a dry academic text by any means. It is a riveting character study of Kissinger and also to a lesser extent of President Nixon.

As Kissinger is quoted in the book as saying, personality shapes history. Nixon's and Kissinger's strange clashing and complementary relationship surely shaped history.4/5. "The Kissinger Transcripts offers an unparalleled view of American diplomacy as conducted by one of the most controversial Secretaries of State in modern U.S.

history. With the record unmediated by Kissinger's spin, readers can begin to make up their own minds about the merits or flaws of a major effort to transform U.S. Cold War strategy."--Jacket. (THE KISSINGER REPORT) Decem CLASSIFIED BY Harry C.

Blaney, III SUBJECT TO GENERAL DECLASSIFICATION SCHEDULE OF EXECUTIVE ORDER AUTOMATICALLY DOWN-GRADED AT TWO YEAR INTERVALS AND DECLASSIFIED ON DECEM This document can only be declassified by the White House.

A handy compilation for readers wanting to see Henry Kissinger's negotiating style for themselves, with extensive and indispensable introductions for each chapter. Drawn mostly from tothe selected excerpts from memoranda of conversations ("memcons") focus more on the Chinese than the Soviets.

Readers should not be misled: the book includes no. Some of the more revealing exchanges between Mr. Kissinger and Mao have already appeared in the book “The Kissinger Transcripts,” taken from the nongovernmental National Security Archive. THE KISSINGER TRANSCRIPTS THE TOP SECRET TALKS WITH BEIJING AND MOSCOW EDITED BY WILLIAM BURR THE NEW PRESS NEW YORK Contents Preface ix Introduction: Henry Kissinger and American Power in a Multipolar World 1 Chapter 1.

"See How Those Pieces Could be Moved to Our. Description: By drawing upon hitherto unpublished transcripts of his telephone conversations during the Yom Kippur War () and the last days of the Vietnam War (), Henry Kissinger reveals what goes on behind the scenes at the highest levels in a diplomatic crisis.

The two major foreign policy crises in this book, one successfully. "Nixon and Kissinger: Partners in Power" is by presidential historian Robert Dallek, who spent four years reviewing the Nixon administration's recently opened archives, includ pages of Kissinger's telephone transcripts and hundreds of hours of Nixon tapes.

ISBN: OCLC Number: Description: xix, pages ; 25 cm: Contents: Introduction: Henry Kissinger and American power in a multipolar world --Ch. 1."See how those pieces could be moved to our advantage": Washington-Moscow-Beijing, --Ch. 2."Two former enemies," Kissinger in Beijing. Henry Kissinger's secretaries transcribed his telephone conversations as National Security Adviser and Secretary of State.

The original transcripts were never edited at the time they were typed. Initially, secretaries listened in on calls using a "dead key" extension on the phone system and prepared summaries of conversations.

Records of Kissinger’s telephone exchanges, covering the entire span of his government service, are now in the process of being released—they form, for instance, the primary basis of his new book, Crisis, dealing with the Yom Kippur war and the end of the Vietnam war. All of them have been given by him for inclusion in the Nixon Library.

Dr. Kissinger: “Between us and China, we represent one-fifth of the world. Based on transcripts, interviews and 90 percent of what I’ve said, this book is for future diplomats.”Author: Cindy Adams.

There are several excellent books already in print by or about Richard M. Nixon and/or Henry A. Kissinger, notably Memoirs of Richard Nixon and Richard Reeves' President Nixon: Alone in the White House as well as Walter Isaacson's biography of Kissinger and The Kissinger Transcripts: The Top-Secret Talks With Beijing and by: It cobbled together transcripts from duplicates that were fitfully released by the Government or pried out with freedom-of-information lawsuits.

The result is an episodic sampling of Kissinger's artful efforts in to play off Beijing and Moscow against each other. Although much of Burr's analysis leaves a lot to be desired, this book is a must have for a first hand look at Kissinger's diplomatic legacy.

There is still much information that has not been declassified and therefore _The Kissinger Transcripts_ presents only a partial picture at best, but Burr's compilation is well worth the effort to see Kissinger's many different diplomatic faces 5/5(4).

The following book review by the NY Times says it all about the book. It’s been four decades since President Richard M.

Nixon sent Henry A. Kissinger to Beijing to re-establish contact with China, an ancient civilization with which the United Stat.By drawing upon hitherto unpublished transcripts of his telephone conversations during the Yom Kippur War () and the last days of the Vietnam War (), Henry Kissinger reveals what goes on behind the scenes at the highest levels in a diplomatic ed on: Aug